Tuck

Katharina Lewellen

Associate Professor of Business Administration


About

Katharina Lewellen is associate professor of business administration at the Tuck School. She has been at Tuck since 2005. Before coming to Tuck she held a faculty position at MIT’s Sloan School of Management. Professor Lewellen received a PhD from the University of Rochester and a doctorate from the University of Zurich. Earlier, she worked as an economist at the Swiss National Bank.

Professor Lewellen’s expertise is in corporate finance, capital structure, investments, and corporate governance. She studies various aspects of corporate financing and investment decisions, such as managerial incentives, taxes, and financing constraints. In her recent work, she investigates how U.S. multinational firms structure ownerhsip of their foreign operations. Her other current projects focus on investment choices of nonprofit firms. Lewellen has received several honors and awards, including The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation grant, The Nasdaq Stock Market Educational Foundation award and the Swiss National Science Foundation Fellowship.

Highlights

The Law of Unintended Consequences  //


Research by Katharina Lewellen shows that incentives for CEOs are not working perfectly. Read the article in the Economist

How stock options lead CEOs to put their own interests first  //


Professor Lewellen shows how the vesting of CEO equity brings a focus on short term results. Read the article

Blog post on Equity Vesting and Managerial Myopia  //

Post by Dirk Jenter and Katharina Lewellen on the Harvard Law School Forum for Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation. Click here

NBER preview of CEO Preferences and Acquisitions  //

CEOs' retirement preferences have a significant impact on firms' takeover decisions and on shareholder value. Click here

Contact

E-Mail

Phone

603-646-8247

Fax

603-646-1698

Degree

  • Simon Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Rochester, Ph.D., Finance, 2003
  • University of Zurich, Switzerland, Doctorate, Economics, 1997
  • Master in Economics, 1995