In the Media

How Many Women Does It Take to Change a Broken Congress?

Dec 29, 2018 // Mentions research by Adam Kleinbaum, examining “organizational misfits”—people who follow career trajectories that are atypical in their organization—in an article about the new United States Congress, which includes a record high number of women representatives.
View at The Conversation

The Top 10 Insights from the ‘Science of a Meaningful Life’ in 2018

Dec 18, 2018 // Highlights “Similar Neural Responses Predict Friendship” by Adam Kleinbaum and coauthors Carolyn Parkinson and Thalia Wheatley, in an article featuring the top research insights from 2018.
View at Greater Good Magazine

Climbing the Corporate Ladder: Slow May Beat Fast

Sep 20, 2018 // Cites research by Adam Kleinbaum, associate professor of business administration, which found that workers who have experience in numerous departments within a company often have more successful careers in the long-run, thanks in part to the broad social networks they create early on in their careers.
View at The Globe and Mail

Friend Connection

Jul 30, 2018 // Features research by Adam Kleinbaum and coauthors Carolyn Parkinson and Thalia Wheatley exploring neural similarities among friends. The results of the research suggest that friendship goes beyond shared interests, and that friends may actually be similar in how they pay attention to and process the world around them.
View at The Telegraph India

You Might Share More in Common with Your Friends Than You Think

Jul 30, 2018 // Quotes Adam Kleinbaum in an article about likeness among friends, citing a recent paper by Kleinbaum, and coathors Carolyn Parkinson and Thalia Wheatley, which found that friends demonstrate similar neural activity.
View at Deutsche Welle

Why Climbing the Corporate Ladder May Be the Worst Path to the Top

Jul 24, 2018 // Features research by Adam Kleinbaum in an article about the value of a having a diverse network of contacts that spans different industries and groups.
View at Quartz

Friends Are Similar Deep in the Brain

May 11, 2018 // Highlights research by Adam Kleinbaum and coauthors Carolyn Parkinson and Thalia Wheatley, exploring how brain activity can be used to predict friendships.
View at Psychology Today

Friends Can Share Similar Brain Waves, Genetics, and Personality Traits — Here’s Why It Happens

Apr 20, 2018 // Highlights research by Adam Kleinbaum and coauthors Carolyn Parkinson and Thalia Wheatley, exploring how neural activity can be used to predict friendships.
View at Business Insider

Scientists Discover Friends Can Share Brainwaves

Apr 23, 2018 // Highlights research by Adam Kleinbaum and coauthors Carolyn Parkinson and Thalia Wheatley, regarding how neural activity can be used to predict friendships.
View at Estadão

You Share Everything with Your Bestie. Even Brain Waves.

Apr 16, 2018 // Features research by Adam Kleinbaum exploring how neural activity can predict friendships.
View at The New York Times

Looking for Your Dream Job? Swipe Right

Apr 10, 2018 // Features Adam Kleinbaum in an article about the rise of professional networking apps such as Shapr. Kleinbaum says research shows that people with diverse and far-reaching networks get promoted faster and evaluated more favorably.
View at BBC Capital

Brain Scans Reveal That Friends Really Are on the Same Wavelength

Mar 14, 2018 // Highlights research by Adam Kleinbaum and coauthors Carolyn Parkinson and Thalia Wheatley exploring how neural activity can be used to predict friendships. In the study, the brain activity of 42 students was observed while they watched a variety of videos meant to stimulate certain emotions.
View at The Star Online

Dartmouth Study: Friends Think Alike

Feb 13, 2018 // Continued coverage of new research from Adam Kleinbaum and coauthors Carolyn Parkinson and Thalia Wheatley, exploring the connection between neural activity and friendships.
View at Valley News

Brain Scans Reveal That Friends Really Are on the Same Wavelength

Feb 06, 2018 // Continued coverage of new research from Adam Kleinbaum, associate professor of business administration, and coauthors Carolyn Parkinson and Thalia Wheatley exploring how neural activity can be used to predict friendships.
View at Qatar Tribune

Scientists say they can predict who you're friends with based on brain patterns alone

Jan 31, 2018 // Quotes Adam Kleinbaum in continued coverage of new research from Kleinbaum and coauthors Carolyn Parkinson and Thalia Wheatley exploring how neural activity can predict friendships. Kleinbaum says it's not clear whether people are seeking out friends whose brains are already like theirs, or if friends change the ways e
View at Business Insider

Brain scans reveal that friends really are on the same wavelength

Jan 31, 2018 // Features new research from Adam Kleinbaum and coauthors Carolyn Parkinson and Thalia Wheatley that explores how brain activity can be used to predict friendships. The authors found that for each one-unit increase in neural similarity, there was a 47 percent increase in the odds that the two participants were friends.
View at Los Angeles Times

Introvert Or Extrovert? Here’s Another Way To Think About Your Personality

Oct 02, 2017 // People’s social networks tend to be full of extroverts. This leads to a “systematic network extroversion bias,” where people’s social networks are overpopulated with extroverts, and therefore under-populated by introverts relative to the general population.
View at Fast Company

The Brain Boasts Its Own Social Network

Apr 20, 2017 // Highlights recent research by Adam Kleinbaum and co-authors that shows how social networks have become so important that the human brain has evolved to encode and recognize the position of others within a social group at a precognitive level.
View at Scientific American

Our 2016 Honor Roll: The 40 Under 40 Most Outstanding MBA Professors

Apr 13, 2016 // Adam Kleinbaum, associate professor of business administration, was named one of Poets and Quants' 2016 Best 40 Under 40 Professors.
View at Poets and Quants

Extroverts Are Rarer Than You Think — So Are You One, Or Not?

Apr 15, 2015 // Continued coverage of a recent study co-authored by Adam Kleinbaum, associate professor of business administration, which found that extroverts are over-represented in real-world networks, and that the effect is more pronounced in the networks of socially outgoing people.
View at Yahoo! Health